Industrial relations

G4-DMA LA G4-LA4

Enel applies the labor law of the various countries and the International Labor Organization’s (ILO) Conventions on workers’ rights (freedom of association and collective bargaining, consultation, right to strike, etc.), systematically promoting dialogue between the parties and seeking an adequate level of agreement on corporate strategies on the part of employees.

Industrial relations at Group level continue to be undertaken in accordance with the model envisaged in Enel’s Global Framework Agreement (GFA), which was signed in Rome in 2013 with the Italian federations and global federations IndustriAll and Public Services International. The agreement is based on the principles of human rights, labor law and the best and most advanced systems of transnational industrial relations of multinational groups and reference institutions at international level, including the ILO.

During 2015 efforts intensified with regard to information and consultation for both the European Works Council and the Global Works Council in relation to the Group’s new organizational structure and the scheduled meetings with the heads of the Global Business Lines. The organization of Expo 2015 and Enel’s activities in the company pavilion and in managing Expo’s smart city allowed to hold the plenary meeting in July 2015 in Milan, and, at the same time, to take the tour of the national pavilions of countries where Enel operates. In the various meetings of the Select Committee joint training was also identified on economic issues and sustainability, which took place in November in conjunction with the second EWC/GWC, which was well received by the various members of the Group’s workerrepresentation bodies.

During 2015 Enel took part in two projects coordinated by the ILO and by BusinessEurope on Transnational Company Agreements (TCA), in which the Enel Global Framework Agreement was recognized and appreciated as best practice at the level of European and non-European multinationals.

Minimum notice period in the case of organizational changes

CountryMinimum periodLegal provisions/collective agreements
Italy 25 days. Legal provisions
Spain and Portugal 30 days. Framework Guarantee Agreement for Endesa SA and subsidiaries in Spain (September 12, 2007)
Slovakia 60 days for workers who have been employed for less than 5 years, 90 days for workers who have been employed for more than 5 years. Legal provisions
Russia 60 days. Legal provisions
Romania Employers are obliged to inform and consult workers’ representatives on development in the company’s economic and business situation. For collective dismissals, minimum 30 days notice to unions and 20 days to workers. The maximum period for the collective dismissal procedure is 90 days. Legal provisions Collective Contract
Argentina Obligation of periodic update to workers’ representatives; traditionally the notice period for changes in working hours, in the role of employees or the work location is 48 hours, although there is no specific regulation. -
Brazil Obligation to provide “prompt” information. -
Colombia NNeither the law nor collective bargaining envisage a minimum notice period in the case of organizational changes. -
Peru Neither the law nor collective bargaining envisage a minimum notice period in the case of organizational changes. -
Chile Neither the law nor collective bargaining envisage a minimum notice period in the case of organizational changes. -